Notes on Contributors

Notes on contributors to the most recent issues of Scandinavica.

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  • ANDERS THYRRING ANDERSEN (Mag.art. in Comparative Literature, special education in Theology; Post.doc. at the Institute of Literature, Culture and Media Studies at the University of Southern Denmark) is member of the research programme in Welfare Narratives. He is the author of Polspænding. Forførelse og dialog hos Martin A. Hansen (2011) and editor of Martin A. Hansen: Dagbøger 1931-55 (1999) and Kætterbreve. Martin A. Hansens korrespondance med kredsen omkring Heretica (2004). He has also published a number of books and articles on Shakespeare, H.C. Andersen, Kierkegaard, Johannes V. Jensen, Bob Dylan, Christian modernism and postwar literature.
  • CLAUS ELHOLM ANDERSEN is a lecturer at the Department of Finnish, Finno-Ugrian and Scandinavian Studies at the University of Helsinki in Finland. He has published academically on irony, poetry, romanticism, and Kierkegaard and has previously taught at the University of Minnesota (2000-2004), University of Texas at Austin (2005-2008), and University of California, Los Angeles (2008-2011). He received his Cand. Mag.-degree from the University of Copenhagen in 1999 and has in tandem with his academic career written widely for Danish newspapers. He is presently working on a project on poetry and recollection.
  • MORTEN SKUMSRUD ANDERSEN is a doctoral candidate at the London School of Economics, where he is finishing his thesis on the practical uses of the balance of power, and an associate of the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs.
  • EJNAR STIG ASKGAARD Curator at the Hans Christian Andersen Museum, Odense City Museums since 1997 and curator at the Carl Nielsen Museum, Odense City Museums from 1997 to 2014. Senior Curator since 2005. Magister Artium in Literature Science from the University of Southern Denmark, 1994, with the dissertation The Romantic Universe –  on Hans Christian Andersen’s ‘The Snow Queen’. Editor of the yearly journal Anderseniana since 1998. Recent publication: An annotated and text critical edition of Carl Nielsen’s autobiography Min fynske Barndom (My Funen Childhood), 2015.
  • KERSTIN BERGMAN is a Senior Research Fellow in Comparative Literature at the Centre for Languages and Literature, Lund University, Sweden. Her main field of research is contemporary crime fiction, and she specializes in Swedish crime fiction as well as in the function of science in crime fiction (literature, film, television). She is the author of En möjlig värld: En tematisk studie av Lars Gustafssons 1990-talsromaner (2002), and the recently published the crime fiction textbook Kriminallitteratur: Utveckling, Genrer, Perspektiv (2011, with S. Kärrholm). Additionally, Bergman has published extensively on both Swedish and international crime fiction. Some of her recent articles are ‘Fictional Death and Scientific Truth: The Truth-value of Science in Contemporary Forensic Crime Fiction’ in Clues: A Journal of Detection 30.1 (2012); ‘The Well-Adjusted Cops of the New Millennium: NeoRomantic Tendencies in the Swedish Police Procedural’ in Scandinavian Crime Fiction, ed. A. Nestingen and P. Arvas, Cardiff: U of Wales P, 2011); and ‘Paradoxes of Understanding the Other: Mankell Explores the “African Darkness”’ in Scandinavian Studies 82.3 (2010).
  • ANNE KLARA BOM, PhD, is an Assistant Professor at the University of Southern Denmark, Department for the Study of Culture, The Hans Christian Andersen Centre. She has written her PhD thesis, articles and book chapters on icon-cities, heritage tourism, Hans Christian Andersen as a cultural phenomenon, and discourse analysis. Among her recent publications are the books Diskursanalytisk metode, 2015 and H.C. Andersen i det moderne samfund, 2014 (co-editor), and the articles ‘Where fiction really exists: The staging and experience of authenticity in the literary icon-city’ in a special issue of Aktuel Forskning, 2015, and ‘Affective practice in the icon-city: Ownership, authenticity and fictionalization of urban space’ in Academic Quarter 10: 35-52, 2015
  • MADS BUNCH is Mag. Art. in Nordic Literature from The University of Copenhagen (2004). From 2006 to 2011 he was a Lecturer in Danish and Scandinavian Studies at The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada. He is currently working on his PhD thesis, Reading Blixen in the Light of Kierkegaard, at The University of Copenhagen. He has published articles on August Strindberg, Henrik Ibsen, Lars von Trier. He authored the book Samtidsbilleder – realismen i yngre dansk litteratur 1994-2008 (2009) and is the editor of the book Millennium. Nye retninger i nordisk litteratur (2012).
  • OCTAVIA CADE has recently graduated with a PhD in science communication from the University of Otago in New Zealand. Her thesis looked at science poetry, and how science communicators can use poetry to more effectively talk about science. Her first poetry collection, Chemical Letters, is based on the periodic table and is currently in press.
  • ELETTRA CARBONE is Senior Teaching Fellow in Norwegian at the Department of Scandinavian Studies, UCL. She holds a PhD in Scandinavian Studies and an MA in Comparative Literature from UCL. She has co-edited a number of anthologies on different aspects of Nordic culture and literature. These include a publication on the reception of the Italian Risorgimento in Norway (Lyset kommer fra sør, Gyldendal, 2011), a themed issue of the journal Scandinavica on Nordic publishing and book history (Scandinavica 51:2, 2012) and an anthology on sculpture in the Nordic Region (Ashgate, 2016). Elettra Carbone has also published extensively in peer-reviewed journals and anthologies on representations of Italy in Nordic Literatures, Hans Christian Andersen, and the relationship between literature and sculpture. Her current research interests include the cultural mobility and remediation of Thorvaldsen\'s sculptures through print culture, and representations of the Norway in British literature.
  • ROBERT CARDULLO is Professor of Media and Communication at the Izmir University of Economics in Turkey. His essays have appeared in such journals as the Yale Review, Cambridge Quarterly, Cinema Journal, and The New Republic; and he is the author, editor, or translator of numerous books on film and drama, the most recent of which are World Directors in Dialogue: Conversations on Cinema and André Bazin and Italian Neorealism.
  • MASSIMO CIARAVOLO is Associate Professor of Scandinavian Studies at the University of Florence. He has written books on Hjalmar Söderberg as a literary critic (1994), and on the reception of the flâneur among Finland-Swedish writers at the beginning of the twentieth century (2000). He has contributed to Finlands svenska litteratur (2000, new edition 2014) and co-edited volumes of Scandinavian Studies on literature and history (2011) and autobiography (2015). In his articles he has researched representations of the experience of modernity at the end of the nineteenth and beginning of the twentieth century, and of the Holocaust.
  • GIULIANO D’AMICO is an Associate Professor of Scandinavian literature at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. He holds a Ph.D. in comparative literature from the University of Oslo, which he received in 2011. His main research interests include the reception and translation history of Scandinavian authors like Henrik Ibsen, Bjørnstjerne Bjørnson, August Strindberg and Knut Hamsun in Europe (most notably in Domesticating Ibsen for Italy. Enrico and Icilio Polese’s Ibsen Campaign. Bari, Edizioni di pagina 2013). He has also developed an interest in the academic study of Western esotericism and how it has influenced selected Scandinavian authors and their reception.
  • PETER FJÅGESUND (DPhil Oxon) is Professor of British Literature and Civilisation at University College of Southeast Norway. He has worked as Director of the Norwegian Study Centre, University of York, and has published numerous articles on nineteenth- and twentieth-century literature and cultural history. He is the author of The Apocalyptic World of D.H. Lawrence (Norwegian University Press, 1991); with Ruth A. Symes, The Northern Utopia: British Perceptions of Norway in the Nineteenth Century (Rodopi, 2003); and he is the editor of Knut Hamsun Abroad: International Reception (Norvik Press, 2009). His most recent book is The Dream of the North: A Cultural History to 1920 (Rodopi, 2014). He has also translated a number of British novels into Norwegian.
  • HELENA FORSÅS-SCOTT (Professor of Swedish and Gender Studies at University College London, retired 2010) researches chiefly on twentieth-century Swedish texts by women with an emphasis on narrative, subjectivity, intermediality and ecocriticism. Her most recent book is Re-Writing the Script: Gender and Community in Elin Wägner (Norvik Press, London, 2009). She is currently co-editor of Re-Mapping Lagerlöf: Performance, Intermediality and European Transmissions, and of The Encyclopaedia of Contemporary Nordic Culture and coordinator of ‘Selma Lagerlöf in English’ (Norvik Press 2011-).
  • JOHS. NøRREGAARD FRANDSEN Professor, Head of Hans Christian Andersen Centre, University of Southern Denmark. Area of research: Danish culture and literature in the 19th and 20th century. Manages a current research project on landscapes and literary routes. Member of staff at TRAP Danmark. Recent publications: Tre jyske tenorer: Johannes V. Jensens, Jeppe Aakjærs og Thøger Larsens lyrik, 2008 (co-editor), Dansk litteraturs historie 1870-1920, 2009 (co-author), Mere end en skole: De danske efterskolers historie, 2012 (co-editor), Hans Christian Andersen in China, 2014 (co-editor), Hans Christian Andersen’s Magic Trunk, 2015 (co-editor), Dialogbaseret planlægning i det åbne land: Strategier for kulturlandskabets fremtid, 2015 (coauthor), "Fortællinger fra et aftenland: Provins i dansk litteratur og film”, Kritisk Forum 1: Den centrale periferi, 1994, 143, 2016.
  • BÅRD FRYDENLUND is a historian and head of The Norwegian Iron Works Museum (Næs Jernverksmuseum). His publications include Spillet om Norge. Det politiske året 1814 [The Game of Norway. The Political Year 1814] (2014); \'Defying the Continental System in the Periphery: Political Strategies and Protests by Norwegian Magnates\' in Revisiting Napoleon\'s Continental System. Local, Regional and European Experiences, ed. K. Aaslestad and J. Joor (2014); \'Political Practices among Merchants in Denmark and Norway in the Period of Absolutism\', in Scandinavia in the Age of Revolutions: Nordic Political Cultures, 1740-1820, ed. M. Bregnsbo, et.al. (2011); and Stormannen Peder Anker. En biografi [The Magnate Peder Anker. A Biography] (2009).
  • ERIN MICHELLE GOERES is Lecturer in Old Norse Language and Literature at the Department of Scandinavian Studies, UCL. She gained her DPhil from the University of Oxford in 2010, following an MA at the University of York and a BA(Hons) at the University of Winnipeg. In the past she has written on Old Norse poetry and the kings\' sagas; she is currently writing a book on the literary relationship between Scandinavia and Anglo-Norman England during the post-Conquest period.
  • ANE GRUM-SCHWENSEN Postdoc at The Hans Christian Andersen Centre, University of Southern Denmark and curator at The Hans Christian Andersen Museum, Odense City Museums since 1998. PhD 2014 with a dissertation applying genetic criticism to formerly unpublished notes, drafts and manuscripts from the late part of Andersen’s authorship. Co-editor of H.C. Andersen og det uhyggelige (2015). Recent publications: ‘“Til Afbenyttelse ved Stemning” – litterære billeder og recirkulation i H.C. Andersens manuskripter’ for the anthology Danske litterære forfatterarkiver (in press)
  • D. GANTT GURLEY is Assistant Professor of Scandinavian at the University of Oregon. Before coming to University of Oregon he was a Harry Starr Fellow in Judaica at the Center for Jewish Studies at Harvard University. His forthcoming book Meïr Aaron Goldschmidt and the Poetics of Jewish Fiction examines one of Denmark’s greatest nationalistic writers as first and foremost a Jewish artist, exploring his relationship to the Hebrew Bible and later Rabbinical traditions such as the Talmud and the Midrash as a form of poetics. His research and teaching interests include ancient and medieval song culture, the birth of the novel, the Wandering Jew, Long Romanticism, Old Norse literature, Danish poetry, Scandinavian folklore, and notions of religiosity in the Danish Golden Age.
  • LARS HANDESTEN is an Associate Professor (Lektor) in the Department for the Study of Culture and Literature, Syddansk Universitet. His major publications include Johannes V. Jensen: Liv og værk (2000), Dansk litteraturs historie. Vol. 5, 1960-2000 (on the Sixties and the Nineties) (2006), and Bestsellere: En litteratur- og kulturhistorie om de mest solgte bøger i Danmark siden 1980 (2014). He has published widely on topics including the bestseller phenomenon, Danish literature since the millennium, literary history, and genre, in journals such as Kritik, Passage, and SPRING. He has also published essays and travelogues, including En by i Rusland (2011).
  • NILS GUNDER HANSEN (PhD) is Professor at the Institute of Literature, Culture and Media Studies, University of Southern Denmark. He is the author of Tage Skou-Hansen. Et forfatterskabsportræt (Gyldendal 2004) and of essays on contemporary Danish literature and the welfare state. He is also a member of the research programme in Welfare Narratives.
  • RUTH HEMSTAD is Research Librarian at the National Library of Norway, and Associate Professor at the University of Oslo. She holds a PhD in History from the University of Oslo, where she was also Project Coordinator of the 1905 Project (1999-2005) and Research Fellow for the 1814 Project (2011-2014). In 2012-2013 she was Research Fellow at the Centre for Advanced Study at the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, where she worked on the transformation of international law and Norwegian sovereignty in 1814. She is currently Project Coordinator of a project on the public sphere and freedom of expression in the Nordic countries in the nineteenth century. Hemstad has published extensively on Scandinavianism and Scandinavian cooperation, and on different aspects of Norwegian and international history of the 1810s. Her major publications include "Like a Herd of Cattle": Parliamentary and Public Debates Regarding the Cession of Norway, 1813-1814 (Oslo 2014), Propagandakrig. Kampen om Norge i Norden og Europa 1812-1814 (Oslo 2014) and Fra Indian summer til nordisk vinter. Skandinavisk samarbeid, skandinavisme og unionsoppløsningen (Oslo 2008).
  • JENS JOHAN HYVIK is Associate professor in History at the University College of Southeast Norway. His main research interests deal with nationalism, language and identity, and the relationship between elite and popular culture. His PhD analysed the relationship between language and nationalism in Norway in the eighteenth- and nineteenth centuries, and a revised version of the thesis was published as Språk og nasjon 1739-1868. Norsk målreising. Band 1 (Samlaget: Oslo, 2009). His most recent book is Tokulturlæra i norsk historie (Samlaget: Oslo, 2016).
  • CHRISTINA JUST is a MA student of European Literatures and Scandinavian Studies at Humboldt University where she has worked as student assistant. With an expertise in theatre and performance, she wrote her BA thesis on contemporary theatre in Greenland. Christina has worked in the field of theatre pedagogy at Schauspielhaus Hannover where she developed several theatre performances with teenagers and coordinated a festival of youth theatre. She also staged Julia Kandzora’s play ‘In Neon’ at Theater im Kino in Berlin.
  • LASSE HORNE KJÆLDGAARD (PhD) is Director of The Society for Danish Language and Literature and Associate Professor of Danish Literature (on leave) at University of Copenhagen. He published Sjælen efter døden: Guldalderens moderne gennembrud (Gyldendal, 2007) and co-authored the book Tolerance - eller hvordan man lærer at leve med dem, man hader (Gyldendal, 2008) and author of Sjælen efter døden: Guldalderens moderne gennembrud (Gyldendal, 2007).
  • LILL-ANN KÖRBER is Wissenschaftliche Mitarbeiterin at Humboldt Universität zu Berlin’s Nordeuropa Institut, specialising in literature, art history and interdisciplinary culture studies. Her current research interests encompass Greenlandic culture and the relations between Norden and Africa in a post-colonial perspective, and she has published widely, and organised events and seminars, on these topics. Her ‘Promotion’ project (2010) was on the motif of bathing men in Scandinavian painting and photography 1900-1920, and she has edited (with Stefanie von Schnurbein) Gesundheit/Krankheit. Kulturelle Differenzierungsprozesse um Körper, Geschlecht und Macht in Skandinavien (Health/Illness. Cultural Differentiation Processes around Body, Gender and Power in Scandinavia) Berlin: Berliner Beiträge zur Skandinavistik 2010. Together with colleague Ebbe Volquardsen, she is editing an anthology on The Postcolonial North Atlantic: Greenland, Iceland and the Faroe Islands.
  • DEAN KROUK received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 2011 and is now an assistant professor in the Department of German, Nordic, and Slavic at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. His first book, Fascism and the Modernist Literary Imagination in Norway, will appear in 2017 with the University of Washington Press. Krouk has published articles about the work of authors such as Knut Hamsun, Karl Ove Knausgård, and Henrik Ibsen, and at UW-Madison he teaches courses in modern and contemporary Scandinavian literature and history
  • RICHARD LANSDOWN is Associate Professor of English at James Cook University in Cairns, Australia, and a graduate of University College London. He is the author of Byron’s Historical Dramas, the Cambridge Introduction to the poet, and a new selection of Byron’s letters and journals with Oxford University Press. He has also published a mild polemic on literary theory, called The Autonomy of Literature, and,  most recently, A New Scene of Thought: Studies in Romantic Realism.
  • CATHERINE LEFEBVRE holds a Master’s degree in Philosophy from the University of Paris, Sorbonne and a doctorate in the History of Ideas from the University of Aarhus, Denmark. She has also studied at New York University. She has worked as Danish lecturer with the University of Caen in France, as curator with the Danish Contemporary Art Foundation and as special consultant under the Ministry for Cultural Affairs in Copenhagen. In 2009, Catherine Lefebvre was appointed director of the Karen Blixen Museum. She prioritises a strong international profile for the museum, which collaborates with institutions on a global scale.
  • ANNE-MARIE MAI (Mag. art. and lic.phil. in Nordic literature) is Professor of Nordic literature at Institute of Literature, Culture and Media, University of Southern Denmark. She has written and edited several works on all aspects of Danish literature, chief among them, Danske digtere i det 20. århundrede, vol I-III (2000-2010), and a history of Danish literature, Hvor litteraturen finder sted. Bidrag til dansk litteraturhistorie, vol I-III (2010-2011). She leads the literary research project, Welfare Narratives, which is funded by the VELUX Foundation, and participates in the interdisciplinary welfare research at the University of Southern Denmark.
  • OLA MESTAD is Professor of Law at the University of Oslo. He is the Chair of the Research Committee for the Bicentennial of the Norwegian Constitution; he headed the Council on Ethics for the Norwegian Government Pension Fund (2010-2015) and was leader (with Dag Michalsen) of the research project The Transformation of International Law and Norwegian Sovereignty in 1814 at the Center for Advanced Studies, The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters (2012-2013). Among recent publications he has edited and contributed to: The Rising Complexity of European Law (2014), Frihetens forskole. Professor Schlegel og eidsvollsmennenes læretid i København (2013) and Human Rights, Corporate Complicity and Disinvestment (2011).
  • DAG MICHALSEN has been Professor in Legal History at the Faculty of Law at the University of Oslo since 1997 and Head of the Research Group Law, Society and Historical Transformation at the Faculty of Law since 2006. He is currently leader of the research project The Public Sphere and Freedom of Expression in the Nordic Countries, 1815-1900. Michalsen has published a number of books and articles on legal history, constitutional history and legal and historical methods both in Norway and abroad. One of his recent major publications is Nye perspektiver på Grunnloven 1814-2014 (Vol I-VI, Oslo 2013-2014).
  • ROBERT MCCOLL MILLAR is Professor in Linguistics and Scottish Language at the University of Aberdeen. He has published on a wide range of subjects, including rapid linguistic change, language contact, social dialectology, the historical sociology of language and language activism and policy in Scotland. His most recent books are (with William Barras and Lisa Marie Bonnici) Lexical Variation and Attrition in the Scottish Fishing Communities (2014) and Contact: the interaction of closely related varieties and the history of English (2016). His Modern Scots: an analytical survey will be published in late 2017.
  • MARK MUSSARI holds a PhD in Scandinavian Studies from the University of Washington. He is an independent scholar and translator who has published extensively on Danish literature and culture, especially on H.C. Branner and Karen Blixen, and on English and world literature. His most recent publications include Popular Music and Popular Television for the Marshall Cavendish Cultural Revolution Series (both 2012), and he is currently translating the Danish writer Dan Turèll’s crime novel Mord i mørket (Murder in the Dark, 1981) into English, to be published by Norvik Press in Winter 2012-13.
  • IVER B. NEUMANN, D. Phil. (Oxon, Politics 1992), Dr. Philos. (Oslo, Social Anthropology, 2009) is Montague Burton Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics and an associate of the Norwegian Institute of International Affairs.
  • ANDREW G. NEWBY is Senior Research Fellow of the Finnish Academy, and Docent in European Area and Cultural Studies at the University of Helsinki. He has written and edited many works on different aspects of northern European history, society and culture, including: The Life and Times of Edward McHugh: Land Reformer, Trade Unionist and Labour Activist (Mellen, 2004); Ireland, Radicalism and the Scottish Highlands (Edinburgh UP, 2007); Michael Davitt: New Perspectives (co-editor, Irish Academic Press, 2009); Famines in European Economic History (co-editor,

    Routledge, 2015), and Éire na Rúise: An Fhionnlain agus Éire ar thóir na saoirse (Coiscéim, 2016).
  • JUAN CHRISTIAN PELLICER is Professor of English Literature at the University of Oslo. He was published widely on eighteenth-century poetry, not least on pastoral, georgic, and epic, and continues writing on the reception of Virgil and Theocritus.
  • DAVID REDVALDSEN studied history at Durham University and University College London, gaining his doctorate in 2007. He was a visiting student at the University of Oslo 2001-2002. Between 2008 and 2011 he was lecturer in social science at Finnmark University College (now part of the University of Tromsø). He also taught intermittently as a teaching assistant and teaching fellow at UCL 2005-2015. Redvaldsen is the author of The Labour Party in Britain and Norway. Elections and the Pursuit of Power between the World Wars, published by I.B. Tauris in 2011.
  • SILKE REEPLOEG is a Post-doctoral Researcher at Karlstad, Sweden, and Associate Lecturer with the University of the Highlands and Islands, Scotland, UK. Her research is interdisciplinary and covers Nordic and Northern cultural history and literature, as well as the history of the Arctic. Recent publications include Seascapes and Dreamscapes: Northern Atlantic Islands and the Sea [eds] Jennings, A., Reeploeg, S., Watt, A. Newcastle on Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishers (in press), and ‘Coastal Cultures in Scotland and Norway: Narratives, Affinity, Contact’, In: Beyond Borealism: New Perspectives on the North [eds] Giles, I., Chapot, L., Cooijmans, C., Foster, R., Tesio, B.. London: Norvik Press, pp. 208-224.
  • ELLEN REES (PhD University of Washington 1995) currently holds a postdoctoral research fellowship in Nordic Literature at the University of Oslo. Her work focuses on the conceptualization and representation of nature in Norwegian literature and film. Recent publications include Figurative Space in the Novels of Cora Sandel (Alvheim & Eide 2010), ‘By the Open Sea: Ibsen’s Fruen fra havet and Fosse’s Nokon kjem til å komme’ (Ibsen Studies 10.2 2011), ‘Domesticated Wilderness in Two Norwegian Children’s Classics’ (Scandinavian Studies 83.1 2011), ‘Problems of Landscape and Representation in Ibsen’s Når vi døde vågner’ (Ibsen Studies 9.2 2010), and ‘Norwave: Norwegian Cinema 1997-2006’ (Scandinavian-Canadian Studies 19 2010).
  • ROSE-ANNE ROSS is currently researching her dissertation for the MA in European Culture in the School of European Languages, Culture and Society at UCL, and co-editing an anthology of essays on Nordic Cinema by UCL students.
  • TIMOTHY SAUNDERS is Associate Professor of English Literature and Culture at Volda University College in Norway. His research frequently involves reception studies, especially the reception of classical antiquity in the European literary tradition, and his publications in this field include the edited volume Romans and Romantics (Oxford University Press 2012) and articles and book chapters on Dante, Joseph Brodsky, Brian Friel, the Schlegel brothers, and Percy Shelley.
  • PETER SIMONSEN (PhD) is Associate Professor at the Institute of Literature, Culture and Media Studies, University of Southern Denmark. He leads the Institute’s research programme in Welfare Narratives and is the author of essays on contemporary Danish literature, old age and the welfare state as well as a number of works on English Romanticism.
  • HENRIETTE STEINER is Associate Professor at the Section for Landscape Architecture and Planning at the University of Copenhagen. She holds a PhD in Architecture from the University of Cambridge from 2008 and has worked for five years as a Research Associate at the Department of Architecture at ETH Zurich. Her research investigates the cultural role and meaning of architecture, cities and landscapes. She is author of The Emergence of a Modern City: Golden Age Copenhagen 1800–1850 (Ashgate, 2014) and has co-edited several books, most recently Phenomenologies of the City – Studies in the History and Philosophy of Architecture (Ashgate, 2015).
  • CAMILLA STORSKOG is a researcher in Scandinavian Studies at the University of Milan, where she has been teaching Scandinavian literature since 2003. Her ongoing research focuses on the impact of impressionism on Scandinavian literature, a subject on which she is currently completing her PhD dissertation. Her main research interests include questions of intermediality between literature and the visual arts, but recent publications have also concentrated on issues such as autobiography, travel writing and the historical novel. She has worked as a translator of literary texts between Swedish, Finnish and Italian.
  • PER STRÖMBERG, Ph.D., a historian of architecture at Uppsala university, defended his thesis Upplevelseindustrins turistmiljöer (Tourist Environments in the Era of the Experience Economy) in 2007 on themed environments and conceptualization of tourist attractions and hotels in today’s tourism industry. Since then, he has worked at a series of universities and research institutes in Norway in which he practices action research for tourism development. His postdoctoral project at Uppsala University focuses on adapted reuse of buildings as a cultural innovation strategy in tourism, events and retailing. Since 2012, he has been an Associate Professor in Tourism Management at University College of Southeast Norway
  • BJARNE THORUP THOMSEN is a Reader in Scandinavian Literature in the Scandinavian Studies Section of the Department of European Languages and Cultures at the University of Edinburgh. His main research interests concern aesthetical, affective and ideological dimensions of place and space in modern Scandinavian literature, with a particular focus on the novel and on travel writing. Recent publications include: Re-Mapping Lagerlöf. Performance, Intermediality, and European Transmissions, ed. with Helena Forsås-Scott and Lisbeth Stenberg (Nordic Academic Press, 2014), \'Eyvind Johnson\'s Hybrid North. Dynamics of Place and Time in Travelogues and Memory Sketches 1943-1963\', Journal of Northern Studies, 2014(1), and \'Text, Traffic and Transnational Thought. Perspectives on Prose Publications by Selma Lagerlöf in Periodicals and Anthologies\', Scandinavica, 51(2), 2013.
  • BEVERLY A. THURBER is Assistant Professor of Humanities and Natural Sciences at Shimer College. Her research is in historical linguistics and the history of ice skating.
  • ANNE MARIT WAADE, Associated Professor at School of Culture and Communication, Aarhus University in Denmark. Her main research interests include mediated places, creative industry and promotional culture, e.g. location in TV series, film tourism, place branding, and cartographic aesthetics in travel series. More recently she has focused on the export of Danish TV drama, transnational quality television drama series and collaboration across industries (www.danishtvdrama.au.dk). Recent publications: When Public Service Drama Travels (2016, co-authored), Local colour in German and Danish television drama (2015, co-authored), Nordic Noir production value (2013, co-authored), Armchair tourism (2014, co-authored), Wallanderland (2013), Medier og turisme (2010, co-authored).